Ebola Treatment Developed at Galveston’s University of Texas Medical Branch Proves Effective

Just months after Ebola came to Texas and created a stir, researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, who had long been researching the disease, have announced successful development of a post-exposure treatment. One that is proving to be effective against a specific strain of the Ebola virus that killed thousands of people in West Africa.

The study results, in the April 22 edition of Nature Journal, demonstrated that the treatment is the first to be shown effective against the new Makona outbreak strain of Ebola in animals that were infected with the virus and exhibited symptoms of the disease. Tests on humans is still in the next phase of the research.
(Video: KPRC 2 News)

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(Video: UTMB-Galveston August 2014)

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STAAR Opt-Out Movement: Growing Numbers of Texas Parents Have Had Enough of Standardized Testing

As children across Houston and Texas take the state mandated STAAR exams, some parents are keeping their kids home. An ever growing number of parents are concerned the focus on standardized tests has gone to far, and that the pressure on the kids and the incentives for teachers and schools to just “teach the test” are making kids actual education suffer.  (Video: KHOU 11 News)

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Rebekah Strong! Houstonian Returns to Boston Marathon on New Leg and With Great Network of Support

Two years after the Boston Marathon bombing, Houston-area resident Rebekah Gregory, who ultimately lost a leg due to her injuries, returned to the race to take her life back. Although she was not even a runner in 2013, on Monday she ran the last few miles of the Marathon on her new prosthetic leg. And with the backing of many supporters in Texas and Boston who have helped her recover in mind and body. (Video: KPRC 2 News)

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